Norseman

22046794_10155175395671849_1731915801151394908_n.jpg
22046794_10155175395671849_1731915801151394908_n.jpg

Norseman

1,000.00

Kiowa| 30 x 40 |
Dan Deer illustrates an allegorical representation between Oscar Jacobson and the famous Kiowa six. “THE KIOWA SIX” The Native American artists; James Auchiah (1906-1974), Spencer Asah (1905/ 1910-1954), Jack Hokeah (1902-1969), Stephen Mopope (1898-1974), and Monroe Tsatoke (1904-1937) and Lois (Bougetah) Smoky (1907-1981) were young and they Kiowa Tribal members from the Anadarko area of Oklahoma. Because of their talent and the opportunities afforded them at The University of Oklahoma, they became international celebrities. It is well-remembered that these young Kiowa artists were occasionally homesick for their Kiowa cultural heritage and that during those times they would gather at the Jacobson House to sing, dance and tell Kiowa stories.
These six Kiowa artists, not alone but in particular, exerted a strong and positive influence on Native American artists, all Native Americans trying to accommodate drastic new conditions. Their achievement was a source of pride. 
Art is a vocation compatible with Native American communal values; the world of art has become a major arena for economic development for Native Americans.

Oscar Brousse Jacobson was born on May 16, 1882, in Westervik, Kalmar Lan, Sweden. He emigrated to Lindsborg, Kansas, in 1890 and studied at Bethany College, where he received a bachelor's degree in 1908. He continued his studies at the Louvre in Paris, in Sweden, and in Denmark. In 1916 he received a master of fine arts degree at Yale University and in 1941 a doctorate of fine arts from Bethany College in Lindsborg. He worked as director of the School of Art at the University of Oklahoma (OU) from 1915 until 1954. He and his wife, Jeanne d'Ucel, had three children, Yvonne, Oscar, Jr., and Yolanda. 
Jacobson's name is synonymous with early-twentieth-century art in Oklahoma. Educated in Europe and America, he tirelessly promoted all arts to the young state. One genre, traditional Plains Indian art, is now inexorably bound to him and to the University of Oklahoma. Because Jacobson held Indian people in good regard and treated them with respect, he became their champion and mentor. In the late 1920s he and professor Edith Mahier, also of the OU art school, worked with a small group of five Kiowa men and briefly with one Kiowa woman. These artists and their style became world famous and have always been associated with Oscar B. Jacobson. In addition, he founded the Association of Oklahoma Artists and formally advised the Works Progress Administration's Federal Art Project for Oklahoma in the 1930s.

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